US, Germany oppose amendments to electoral laws

Written By: Rose Welimo
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Amendments

The United States and the German Federal Government have opposed amendments to the electoral laws saying it is not consistent with international best practice and time is insufficient to effect such changes before the October 26th presidential repeat poll.

In a press statement signed by the US Department Spokesperson Heather Nauert, the move would increase political tension and undermine public perceptions of the integrity of the electoral process.

The US raised concern with political actors from both sides urging them to stop their unreasonable demands on the electoral commission IEBC adding that they fully support efforts to engage leaders and parties in dialogue, and urge all to participate openly, and in good faith.

“A peaceful and transparent poll that provides all Kenyans a voice in choosing their next President will require that the electoral commission have the independence and support it needs to fulfill its Constitutional and legal obligations,” said the statement.

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It further added that the US Government remains committed to supporting a free, fair, and credible election that is consistent with Kenya’s Constitution, current laws, and institutions.

Kenyan leaders and citizens were urged to reject violence while calling on security services to use restraint in handling demonstration.

It said the election offers Kenya the opportunity to inspire and shape the future of Africa.

Meanwhile, German Federal Government has warned against amending electoral laws. In a statement, the German government is warning that the changes to the electoral laws being fronted by the Jubilee party do not adhere to international best practices.

The statement also asked the opposition NASA to avoid making excessive demands to the IEBC and allow the commission to accomplish its mandate.

The opposition National Super Alliance has threatened to boycott the October 26th repeat elections unless their demands for irreducible minimums are met.

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