Parents and schools asked to be wary of fake educational materials

Written By: Claire Wanja
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Dr Julius Jwan
KICD Chief executive officer, Dr Julius Jwan said nobody has been authorized to sell the Basic Education Curriculum Framework (BECF) on behalf of the institute

Parents and school administrators have been asked to be wary of substandard and fake educational materials in the market.

The warning comes after a man was arrested during this year’s Kenya primary school head teachers association (KEPSHA) conference in Mombasa selling guidelines to the competency based new curriculum.

KICD Chief executive officer, Dr Julius Jwan said nobody has been authorized to sell the Basic Education Curriculum Framework (BECF) on behalf of the institute.

“The document is available on our website for information purposes. It is not right for anyone to down load it and erase our logo then print copies to sell to unsuspecting members of the public,” Dr Jwan said when he addressed participants at the 13th Kepsha conference.

Police manning the conference arrested the suspect on Tuesday evening after he was allegedly found selling the book at Sh 500 per copy.

Dr Jwan appealed to anyone in doubt of the kind of education materials approved by the government to seek clarification from relevant government education agencies instead of falling into the whims of unscrupulous traders.

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Some of the textbooks being sold especially through unofficial channels are not good for teaching and learners as they contain misleading content.

He challenged parents and schools to rely on the orange book, which provides a list of all the books approved for use in schools.

Dr Jwan said they are liaising with other relevant arms of the government including the security personnel to arrest those behind the illegal trade that risks compromising education standards.

“The books might not officially be in schools, but, they could end up in homes as supplementary books,” Dr Jwan observed.

He said the fake books are of poor quality but many Kenyans are lured to them because they are cheap.

Publishers and booksellers have been complaining that the books being illegally sold are denying genuine traders business.

Whereas the genuine traders pay taxes and operate bookshops, those engaged in the illegal business have resorted to shortcuts like hawking the books along the streets of major towns and in education forums.

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