Concerns over increasing cases of antibiotic resistance

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Amoxylin and Septrine as well as Penicillin are the most abused antibiotics by humans while tetracycline is abused in animals.
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Stakeholders have raised concerns over the increasing cases of antimicrobial resistance globally.

Yewande Alimi, an Antimicrobial Resistance Program Coordinator for Africa Centre for Disease Control has warned that the annual deaths due to antimicrobial resistance is expected to rise to 10 million by 2050 from the current 700,000 people if proper mitigation measures are not put in place.

Alimi also called for the enhancement of the regulatory frameworks to control access of antibiotics.

She also named Amoxylin and Septrine as well as Penicillin as the most abused antibiotics by humans while tetracycline is abused in animals.

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She was speaking at the launch of the World Antibiotic Awareness Week, where stakeholders signed a commitment in mitigating Antimicrobial Resistance risks and supporting countries in Africa to implement their National Action Plans.

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The Antibiotics Awareness week is spearheaded the World Health Organization, World Organization for Animal Health and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

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The stakeholders are calling on the need to enhance regulatory frameworks to control access.

They signed a commitment to mitigate AMR risks and supporting countries in Africa to implement their National Action Plans Kenya launched a National Action Plan on Prevention and Containment of Antimicrobial Resistance in November 2017 aiming to promote appropriate use of antimicrobials.

The Ministry of Health has announced it is in process of reviewing the clinical guidelines to ensure rational use of antibiotics.

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“Kenya is no exception to this threat with increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance being reported in hospitals and communities. “AMR is everybody’s fight. It does not respect boundaries. It causes economic burdens & will cost people more if we don’t prevent it.  We need to work together and collaborate more between counties, said Dr. Everlyn Nelima an AMR focal Office.

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