Ministry of Health calls for improved data collection in fight against diabetes

Written By: KBC Reporter
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Ministry of Health calls for improved data collection in fight against diabetes
One of the key issues with delayed diabetes diagnosis is the increased risk of complications such as kidney damage, heart disease, blindness, neural damage leading to amputations and an overall reduced life expectancy. ~Photo Courtesy
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The Ministry of Health has called for improved data collection and publications in the fight against diabetes.

Speaking during the launch of Africa Diabetes Pacesetters initiative National Program Officer, Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, Division of Non-Communicable Diseases at the Ministry of Health Zachary Muriuki challenged doctors to facilitate the process by documenting data collected in health facilities and sharing the same with the national health data registry.

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Muriuki emphasized that the Ministry of Health is committed to having strategic Public-Private partnerships with relevant stakeholders in the health sector to implement programs and initiatives that improve quality and comprehensive diabetes care.

The General Manager of Novo Nordisk Middle Africa Vinay Ransiwal said one of the key issues with delayed diabetes diagnosis is the increased risk of complications such as kidney damage, heart disease, blindness, neural damage leading to amputations and an overall reduced life expectancy.

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These late-stage complications are also the most costly to treat and can impact the financial situation of an entire family as well as halting overall economic development.

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Diabetes is one of the non-communicable diseases on the rise in sub-Sahara Africa with 7 out of 10 adults having type 2 diabetes and not being aware.

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The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that more than 15.9 million people have diabetes and if this is not addressed soon, the figure is set to increase by 162% by 2045.

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