Naivasha tragedy death toll rises to 42 as DNA testing begins

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epaselect epa05670186 A man takes a photograph of burnt out cars on the highway near Naivasha, some 80km north of the capital Nairobi, Kenya, 11 December 2016. An oil tanker lost control and rammed into cars and exploded, causing a huge fire on one of Kenya's main highways on late 10 December. Local newspaper reported 40 people were killed and 12 vehicles were burnt. EPA/DAI KUROKAWA

By Victor Muyakane

KBC Radio_KICD Timetable

The death toll from the Naivasha tragedy has risen to 42 as more casualties succumbed to their injuries at Nairobi and Kenyatta National hospitals.

Postmortem by the Government Pathologist began on Tuesday at University of Nairobi’s Chiromo Mortuary as collection of more DNA samples from relatives continue.

On Monday, a total of 18 DNA samples had been taken from families of the deceased and relatives may get the results after two weeks.

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This timeline was determined by the Director of the National Disaster Control Center Nelson King’otho who asserts that the two weeks is to eliminate the margin of error in identification of the bodies even for the identifiable bodies.

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The quandary was in evidence after two families claiming one of the 5 identifiable bodies, necessitating the use of DNA to certify the valid claims.

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The remaining 29 bodies burnt beyond recognition will only be identified by DNA test. Priority for collection of DNA samples are mothers and children of the deceased.

More than 263 people were given counseling support to help them deal with the aftermath of the horrific incident.

Multi-agency support teams at Chiromo Mortuary are seeking donations of foods and refreshments to support the families looking for their loved ones.

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Prayers are also being held in Naivasha at the scene of the accident.

epa05670188 A prayer book is left on a hood of a burnt out car on the highway near Naivasha, some 80km north of the capital Nairobi, Kenya, 11 December 2016. An oil tanker lost control and rammed into cars and exploded, causing a huge fire on one of Kenya's main highways on late 10 December. Local newspaper reported 40 people were killed and 12 vehicles were burnt. EPA/DAI KUROKAWA
A prayer book is left on a hood of a burnt out car on the highway near Naivasha, some 80km north of the capital Nairobi, Kenya, 11 December 2016 ( EPA/Photo)

Speaking during the Jamhuri day celebrations President Uhuru Kenyatta blamed the Ministry of Transport and Infrastructure for the Naivasha accident

He directed the ministry to erect signage and warnings to motorists near speed bumps on major roads.

President Kenyatta pledged the government’s support for the victims of the tragedy.

 

Additional Info by Caroline Kamau.

 

 

 

 

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