North Korea hails ‘long range’ missile test

By BBC

North Korea says it has successfully tested a long-range “intercontinental” missile.

It is the first time North Korea has claimed to have successfully tested an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), which could potentially have the range to reach the US mainland.

Earlier the US said a missile landed in the Sea of Japan but that it did not pose a threat to North America.

North Korea has increased the frequency of its missile tests, raising tensions.

An announcement on North Korea state television said it had launched a Hwasong-14 missile, overseen by their leader Kim Jong-un.

South Korea said Tuesday’s projectile was launched at 09:40 local time (00:40 GMT) and flew about 930km (578 miles) for about 40 minutes.

Earlier the US Pacific Command said it was an intermediate range missile.

While Pyongyang has appeared to have made progress, experts believe North Korea does not have the capability to accurately target a place with an intercontinental ballistic missile, or miniaturise a nuclear warhead that can fit on to such a missile.

Japanese waters

North Korea fired an intermediate range missile in the direction of Japan, US military officials said.

The land-based missile was fired from near Panghyon airfield, and flew for 37 minutes before landing in the Sea of Japan, said the US Pacific Command.

Japan has lodged a protest and PM Shinzo Abe said the launch “clearly shows that the threat has grown”.

Pyongyang has increased the frequency of its nuclear and missile tests in recent months, raising tensions.

South Korea said Tuesday’s projectile was launched at 09:40 local time (00:40 GMT) and flew about 930km (578 miles).

The missile may have landed in waters claimed by Japan as its exclusive economic zone, according to Japanese officials.

Meanwhile Pyongyang is due to make an “important announcement” later on Tuesday, reported South Korea’s Yonhap news agency.

The big question is: What range does this missile have – could it hit the US? One expert already thinks that it might be able to reach Alaska but not the lower states.

David Wright, a physicist with the US-based Union of Concerned Scientists, said: “If the reports are correct, that same missile could reach a maximum range of roughly 6,700km (4,160 miles) on a standard trajectory.

“That range would not be enough to reach the lower 48 states or the large islands of Hawaii, but would allow it to reach all of Alaska.”

It’s not just a missile that North Korea would need, but also the ability to protect a warhead from the intense heat and vibration as it re-enters the atmosphere, and it’s not clear if North Korea can do that.

On the prospect of North Korea being able to strike the US, President Donald Trump tweeted in January: “It won’t happen.” The truth is that it might – most experts think within five years, probably less. What would President Trump do then?

Grey line

Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told reporters on Tuesday: “North Korea’s repeated provocations like this are absolutely unacceptable.”

Mr Abe said Japan would “unite strongly” with the US and South Korea to put pressure on Pyongyang.

He added that he would call on Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin – who are meeting in Moscow – “to play a more constructive role”.

Mr Trump had earlier called Mr Kim a “pretty smart cookie”.

He has also repeatedly called on Mr Xi to pressure North Korea to end its nuclear and missile programmes. Beijing is Pyongyang’s closest economic ally.

The latest missile launch comes a day after Mr Trump spoke on the phone separately with Mr Xi and Mr Abe about North Korea. The leaders reaffirmed their commitment to a denuclearised Korean Peninsula.

In South Korea, recently-elected President Moon Jae-in has called for an emergency meeting of the country’s security council.

Mr Moon also met with US President Donald Trump last week, with the US leader warning Pyongyang of a “determined response”.

The US recently started setting up its controversial Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (Thaad) system in South Korea, which is aimed at protecting against North Korean missiles.

Neighbours such as China have objected to it as they believe it undermines their security and the regional balance.

On Tuesday, Mr Xi and Mr Putin reiterated their opposition to Thaad, reported Chinese state news agency Xinhua.

  

Latest posts

UN Assembly: Xi Proposes Global Development Initiative

Eric Biegon

Russia, Zimbabwe sign MOU on cooperation in the field of peaceful use of atomic energy

Eric Biegon

US lifts travel ban on UK and EU citizens

Muraya Kamunde

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More