MPs pass contentious amendments to Election Laws

By Edward Kabasa/Christine Muchira

Jubilee allied legislators Thursday morning employed their numerical tyranny to push through six amendments to the election law.

Government allied MPs voted to allow the use of manual vote tallying mechanism in the event of technological failure.

The Proposed Amendment by Majority Leader Aden Duale that relates to whether candidates for  MP or MCA position ought to have degrees and proposed clarification for the requirement to apply during the 2022 elections was also passed.

The MPs also amended a section that required those intending to contest for parliamentary seats in 2017 to have degrees pushing the requirement to 2022.

CORD had early sought to bar the re-committal of the contentious amendments to the committee of the whole house before storming out of the chambers after sensing they had been outnumbered.

The Opposition has now moved to court seeking the amendments to be nullified.

New clause 11A that requires Independent Candidates to submit to the IEBC not only the names they intend to use at the polls but symbols they wish to Section 33(1) ( c ) currently states under Nomination of Independent Candidates was also passed.

The MPs passed Clause 32A that seeks to amend the elections Campaign Financing Act, 2013, to reduce the period by which persons ought to have opened mandatory campaign financing bank accounts and registered with the Commission for the purpose of financing their campaigns.

The amendment is necessitated by the fact that, currently the law requires candidates to have opened and registered those accounts with the IEBC eight months to election.

  

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